light up

(Source: Spotify)

just because…

(Source: Spotify)

"

In 1993 Richard Bentall [M.D., an expert on psychosis from the University of Bangor] […] voluntarily took an antipsychotic drug […] [he] developed akathisia - unpleasant sensations of inner restlessness and an inability to sit still. “It was accompanied by a feeling that I couldn’t do anything, which is really distressing. I felt profoundly depressed. They tried to persuade me to do these cognitive tests on the computer and I just started crying.”

Bentall had volunteered to be in a study run by Irish psychiatrist Dr David Healy. Volunteers were given either 5mg of the antipsychotic droperidol, 1mg of lorazepam, a type of tranquillizer, or a placebo. “The experiment completely failed,” says Bentall.

[…]

most of the healthy volunteers who took the antipsychotic became so unwell, let alone do the cognitive tests, that the study couldn’t continue. One psychiatrist became suicidal and had to be put under observation.

In his controversial book Let Them Eat Prozac Healy wrote about what the volunteers experienced.

"

Unravelling madness - National - NZ Herald News

Healthy volunteers for a research study take anti-psychotics and immediately become severely unwell & unable to do normal tasks, some become suicidal.

(via blinko)

"It was not like anything that had happened to them before… Highly personal memories of previous unhappy times - broken relationships or loneliness - seemed to be flooding back. And if they previously held themselves responsible for these unhappy times, they seemed to hold themselves responsible for feeling the way they did now as well."

Antipsychotics are causing traumatic memory flooding. (via madness-narrative)

“Highly personal memories” :( such an intrusion. I know how that feels. (via fuckyeahmadpride)

(via fuckyeahmadpride)

You’ll Love Her! She’s Crazy!

newyorker:

image

Most educated people can name half a dozen poets who are more famous for their messy lives and deaths than for their poems… The narratives endure because they align with the popular understanding of what it is to be an artist.”

Sarah Manguso writes about Sylvia Plath, who died fifty years ago today, and looks at the changing way we talk about mental illness: http://nyr.kr/1576DDa

Photograph: Contrasto/Redux.

(Source: newyorker.com, via fuckyeahmadpride)

smiliu:

[Article of Interest] Study Links Immigrating at Young Age and Higher Risk of Psychosis

By Nicholas Bakalar

A new study has found that among immigrants, younger age at the time of migration predicts a higher incidence of psychotic disorders.

The study, published last month in The American Journal of Psychiatry, was conducted from 1997 to 2005 in The Hague, Netherlands, where there are detailed records on almost everyone who has sought care for a possible psychotic disorder. The researchers found 273 immigrants, 119 second-generation citizens and 226 Dutch citizens who fit the criteria.

In four groups — people from Suriname, the Netherlands Antilles, Turkey and Morocco — the risk of psychosis was highest among those who immigrated before age 4. There was no association of psychosis with age among Western immigrants.

The researchers, led by Dr. Wim Veling of the Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, investigated various possible explanations — that social factors are involved, that people migrate because they are prone to psychosis, and that a decision to migrate is influenced by early appearance of psychosis, among others. But the correlation persisted.

“We don’t know the reason,” said Dr. Ezra Susser, the senior author and a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, “but it might be related to early social context, which we know has an important influence on later health and mental health.”

(via establishing-a-new-normal)

Timestamp: 1378663707

smiliu:

[Article of Interest] Study Links Immigrating at Young Age and Higher Risk of Psychosis

By Nicholas Bakalar

A new study has found that among immigrants, younger age at the time of migration predicts a higher incidence of psychotic disorders.

The study, published last month in The American Journal of Psychiatry, was conducted from 1997 to 2005 in The Hague, Netherlands, where there are detailed records on almost everyone who has sought care for a possible psychotic disorder. The researchers found 273 immigrants, 119 second-generation citizens and 226 Dutch citizens who fit the criteria.

In four groups — people from Suriname, the Netherlands Antilles, Turkey and Morocco — the risk of psychosis was highest among those who immigrated before age 4. There was no association of psychosis with age among Western immigrants.

The researchers, led by Dr. Wim Veling of the Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, investigated various possible explanations — that social factors are involved, that people migrate because they are prone to psychosis, and that a decision to migrate is influenced by early appearance of psychosis, among others. But the correlation persisted.

“We don’t know the reason,” said Dr. Ezra Susser, the senior author and a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, “but it might be related to early social context, which we know has an important influence on later health and mental health.”

(via establishing-a-new-normal)